20 December, 2015

30 Minute Fashion DIY | Tie Front Jumper

Tie Front DIY

I have mentioned in previous posts that I am always that girl on a budget so I love looking for ways to re-invent my existing wardrobe. After a little mooch around the high-street the other day I realised I was drawn towards all the tie front tops and dresses in the shops at the moment. Rather than buy another top I headed home and dug out an unappreciated grey jumper from my wardrobe. No sewing machine is required for this tutorial but you will need an Eyelet Punch which you can pick up for around ten pounds over on Amazon. Although ten pounds does seem fairly pricey, an Eyelet Punch is a useful tool because, as well as adapting all your dresses/tops so they have the tie front feature, you can also punch holes in belts - which is perfect if you're anything like me and pick up belts in charity shops then get home and realise they are too big!

Ingredients

- Un-used jumper
- Eyelet Punch
- Eyelets (These come with the punch when purchased using the Amazon link I have used)
- Awl
- Thread
- Needle
- Pins
- Fabric Scissors

Tie Front DIY

Step 1: Cut a split down the centre front of your jumper. The length of this split depends on how far you would like the tie to go down the jumper. 

Tie Front DIY

Step 2: Fold under the raw edges and tack neatening the edge of the split. You should end up with a triangle shape as shown in the picture above.

Tie Front DIY

Step 3: Turn the jumper inside out and pin where you would like the eyelets to go.

Tie Front DIY

Step 4: Push the awl through the fabric where you would like the eyelets to go. This makes inserting the eyelets easier. You may have to wriggle it through a fair amount as you may have to go through two layers of fabric (since you turned the raw edges under in a previous step).

Tie Front DIY

Step 5: Select the colour of eyelets you would like for your jumper. I have chosen silver as I think they go well with the grey jumper.

Tie Front DIY

Step 6: Place your chosen eyelet on the hole punch. Then position over the hole made with the awl in the previous step and press down. Make sure the eyelet is placed on the right side of your jumper and the part of the hole punch without the eyelet is placed on the wrong side of your jumper (this is why it is easiest to do this step with the jumper inside out).

Repeat this until you have the number of eyelets required for one side.

Tie Front DIY

Step 7: Once you have completed one side of the eyelets, pin the other side at the same points so the eyelets are evenly spaced as before.

Use the awl, eyelets and hole punch as before until all your eyelets are in place.

Tie Front DIY

Step 8: When the raw edges were turned under in Step 2 the whole length of the split may not have been turned under in equal measure as a triangle shape was created.If the eyelet has one gone through one layer of the fabric the turned under edge may not be secure. If this is the case just secure with a few tiny stitches which would be too noticeable on the front of the jumper - this is to stop the raw edges unfolding.

Where the eyelets have gone through both layers of the fabric, the eyelet will how the raw edges in place.


Tie Front DIY

Step 9: For the tie to thread through the eyelets I cut a small trim off the bottom of the jumper and left the edges raw (as I didn't mind the jumper being that tiny bit shorter). If you don't want to cut your top you could use lace, ribbon or whatever takes your fancy!

Tie Front DIY

And that's it. 30 minutes later and it feels like a whole new jumper from a previously unloved and unworn top.

Tie Front DIY
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3 comments

  1. The final result is super cute !

    Sara,
    www.thecrimeofashion.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. Clever idea! I have an eyelet punch somewhere in my craft stash....!

    ReplyDelete

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